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What inspires us to nurse?

Nursing_123RF_31309931_lTo mark International Nurses Day 2016 we asked our nursing students and staff what inspired them to nurse; this is what they said:

“For me, a role that matters and allows me to contribute to the society I live in.”
Ric, second year student nurse

“Circumstances saw me having to support myself through education from the age of 16, I always persevered, knowing my aim was to become a nurse one day. Life and motherhood saw ten years pass. I knew then that if I want to truly encourage my daughters to become whatever they want to be, it was through doing it myself. An HNC, years of work experience and a year of night college later I am exactly where I know I should be! My daughters are proud of me, and I am proud of myself. Nursing is where my heart is.”
Sandra, third year student nurse

“What motivates me is the opportunity I have to make a difference and to improve the quality of life for others, which for me is more of a calling than a career.”
John, second year student nurse

“I wanted to make a difference, sounds corny but it’s true! I never wanted to do anything else, it may have taken me a few years longer than most, I’m now 37 but now I’m finally making that dream become a reality.”
Hazel, first year student nurse

“I was inspired to go into nursing while working in a high school, I witnessed so many young people struggling with their thoughts, feelings and emotions, not knowing how to manage these.   I want to be able to help them make a difference in their lives so they can mature and grow into confident individuals who are ready for adulthood.”
Pamela, second year student nurse

“I worked with a lovely probationary teacher last year who went into teacher training later. She inspired me, it’s never too late to achieve your dreams.”
Liz, first year student nurse

“I worked in a dementia unit for nearly 4 years, to begin with it was ‘just a job’ (I was 19 at the time and didn’t know what i wanted to do career-wise!) but as the months progressed and I received additional  training and  learning regarding the job. I realized how much I deeply cared for the well-being of all the clients and their families and loved how the feeling of providing care, support, comfort and compassion to each client was like receiving a personal reward on a daily basis. My experience of working as a Care Assistant prompted me to start my training, broaden my skills, expand my knowledge and continue onto a career of more person-centred care.”
Kirsty, first year student nurse

“Helping someone when they cannot help themselves even by just making them smile, nursing is such a rewarding career”
Lindsay, first year student nurse

“When I was 17 other people kept telling me that I should go into nursing. They said I had a strong value base, caring and compassionate nature and an ability to influence people. I always wanted to be a teacher, but didn’t apply as I could not spell! Who would have thought I would end up being a nurse teacher!”
Janet Smith, Teaching Fellow

“I’ve always been interested in the science behind the human body, but witnessing the care and compassion shown by nurses when my Granda was dying made me realise that nursing was the dream career for me –  I wanted to make an impact on someone’s life like those nurses did for me and my family.”
Holly, second year student nurse

“What motivated me to choose nursing was the never ending possibilities nursing offers, as well as being able to make a difference in someone’s life. I also wanted a career, and not just a ‘job’.”
Michelle, third year student nurse

“When I was young (3/4), I spent a lot of time with my granny around nursing homes and would often help the nurses with tea, biscuits and bingo so I was around the environment from a young age. When I was 16, unfortunately I got ill. Although this allowed me to see all the different departments of the hospital I was in. I always had an interest for some science-based jobs, but personally experiencing the kindness of the nurses on the ward made me decide that it was what I wanted to do. I really wanted to give something back, to make other people experience the high level of care and compassion, like the care I had received. And well, here I am!”
Ryan, second year student nurse

“Seeing several family members working in mental health services, and the public’s perception of mental health issues, inspired me to train as a Mental Health Nurse.”
Sophie, first year student nurse

“I wanted to be a nurse because I care about other people’s health and well-being. Whether that be children or adults. I am a mature student and sadly have lost my own parents and my children are more independent. I suppose there in a need in me to nurture and care for other people and I want to make a difference, however small.”
Liz, first year student nurse

“The film Patch Adams.”
Sandra, third year student nurse

What motivated me to become involved with research was the awareness that when someone is in the same position for too long they can stop questioning, they become too set in their ways and are resistant to change.  I didn’t want to become complacent.  I was questioning everything and I needed to be involved with finding answers.”
Gaylor Hoskins, Clinical Academic Research Fellow

“I have always enjoyed helping people, in every aspect of life, therefore nursing is something I have always considered. However it wasn’t till after my travels to South Africa – witnessing poverty and severe illness – that it was made clear to me that I wanted to strive and work to the best of my ability to become a successful, compassionate nurse.”
Caitlin, first year student nurse

“I saw nursing as a challenge, a changing challenge and I’ve never looked back. Can’t wait to qualify!”
Kim, second year student nurse

“The reason I went into nursing is because my aunts are Mental Health Nurses. Initially it never really appealed to me. I was always complaining of how bored I was getting in my job. My aunts said they knew I would make a great nurse and to give a shot. I applied to work as a Rehab Assistant to see if I liked it. I did! I then put my application in to Stirling. The thing I like about it is that you’re always busy, no two days are the same, it is very rewarding and there is job satisfaction. I wish I did it earlier. I have never looked back since!”
Blair, first year student nurse

“I have always had a great amount of empathy for others, I chose mental health nursing to utilise this and have a career in which I care for people every day.”
Ela, first year student nurse

“What motivated me to get into nursing research was the opportunity to use my skills in technology, decision making and interventions to support care delivery, and make a meaningful difference to patients and those who care for them.”
Dr Julie Cowie, Lecturer

“I chose to nurse for the opportunity to make a positive impact on people’s lives, no matter how big or small.”
Kourteney, first year student nurse

“I am constantly inspired by patients and I love the feeling I get when I help others, it is so rewarding, the difference you can make to a person’s/family’s life is incredible and to be in a privileged position to do this is so humbling.”
Nicola, first year student nurse

“The idea of nursing being a rewarding career with so many areas that one can work in and the fact that I love working with people inspired me to get into nursing.”
Davinia, first year student nurse

“My mum and older brother work as nursing assistants in our local mental health wards and always talked about how rewarding it is as a career. They have inspired me to become a nurse from their experience and my want to help others.”
Fionnuala, second year student nurse

“I chose nursing because I liked interacting with people and thought it would be an interesting job – I was so right.”
Dr Susanne Cruickshank, Reader in Cancer Nursing

“I always wanted to study at University and, eventually, at the grand age of 46 I started my nursing degree. Now 2 years into my studies I am loving every aspect of it and looking forward to joining the nursing profession. It was definitely worth the wait!!”
Jane, second year student

“As I was born with a heart defect and went through a heart transplant at the age of 8, I have spent a lot of time in the hospital. The people that supported me the most, held my hand through different procedures and was always there for me when I was scared and vulnerable, was the nurses. They inspired me every day through their hard work and always with a smile around their faces which made me look at life in a more positive way even though that wasn’t always the case. That’s why I want to be a nurse, I want to give something back and help other people as they helped me and my family through the hardest times of my life”. Emilie, second year student

And the last word from Hazel:

“Complications after my surrogate baby was born meant an emergency trip to theatre. I will never forget how I felt a nurse suddenly hold my hand, I never saw her face but that hand ‘spoke’ a thousand words.”
Hazel, first year student nurse

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A student nurse’s guide to an away placement: Isle of Barra, Outer Hebrides

HollieMcMurray-ship

Student Nurse Holly McMurray

Many students are not keen on undertaking an away placement – they may think it’s inconvenient, expensive, and that it won’t really add much to their learning or contribute to their future practice. But it’s not at all, it’s a great experience that everyone should try, if they can.

Accommodation
I was lucky enough to be able to rent a room for the duration of my placement from my mentor who runs a guest house as well as being a district nurse. My room was lovely, I got breakfast and dinner, and had access to everything I needed including the washing machine, ironing board etc. I really couldn’t have asked for better accommodation and hosts.

Transport
Travelling from Stirling to Barra is quite a long journey, around 10 hours, if you go by train and ferry, which is the cheapest option, around £25 single. The ferry journey can be quite boring so I would advise taking a book or something to do. I’d also recommend taking a blanket and pillow so you can sleep because the seats are also quite uncomfy. When you arrive at Castlebay one of the nurses will probably collect you and take you to your accommodation, otherwise there are buses and taxis which can be pre-booked.

BeachRunway

Barra runway

The other option is to get the plane from Glasgow airport to Barra, it is quite expensive between £30 and £75 single depending on how far in advance you book from Flybe, but it only takes about an hour. The plane is tiny – seats around 20 including the pilot. It is a really good experience though as Barra has the only tidal airport in the world – the beach is the runway!

Placement
The Island has a 5-bed hospital called St. Brendan’s. The hospital includes 3 single rooms and 1 twin room, a treatment room, a physio room and a dentist. The community nurses are also in the same building and have their own room upstairs.

There is one doctor who is on call 24/7 and is based in the GP surgery which is around 0.5 miles from the hospital, though new plans are currently being developed to build a new hospital which will house everybody together to make working as a team easier.

Within the hospital everything is nurse led as there are no other health professionals which are constant on the island. All Physio therapists, occupational therapists, dieticians, speech and language therapists etc. are all mostly based on the isle of Lewis in Stornoway which is the main hospital for the western isles, and they visit Barra occasionally. There is also only 1 midwife on the island, who only works 7 hours per week, and only 1 health visitor who is very willing to take student nurses on visits and also to baby clinics – I even got to go on the ferry to the Isle of Uist to visit a few new born babies!

Shoreline-HousesWDuring my time in Barra there weren’t many patients, but I got to spend time with lots of different healthcare professionals – health visitor, midwife, diabetic nurse, practice nurse, community nurses. There were also lots of training days whilst I was there – management of the acutely ill patient, psychoactive substances, continence management and advanced life support. So, although it might be quiet compared to Forth Valley there are plenty of opportunities to keep you busy.

The island itself has very few shops and amenities, so if you do go to Barra I’d recommend bringing everything you need.  The islanders are very friendly and welcoming, but during the winter there isn’t much to do.  There are, however, many events during the summer such as a festival and various fetes/open days, and the beaches are lovely as well, even in the winter.

Overall, I’d definitely recommend going to the Isle of Barra for a placement, to experience how it’s done in a remote and rural area.

Holly McMurray, 2nd year Adult Student Nurse
University of Stirling
Published 13 April 2016

Student Nurse blog: Looking after yourself so you can look after others

Two years ago I started my BSc in Adult Nursing at Highland Campus, University of Stirling, and it feels like it was only yesterday. First years, everyone will keep telling you how quickly the time passes and believe me it does. Blink and you really will miss it. The first few weeks are exciting and really quite nerve-wracking and don’t even start worrying about when you have to get ready to go on that first placement just yet!

This first semester will go so fast. You will learn a lot and gain many new skills. You will also learn a lot about yourself. The one piece of advice I would give myself two years ago would be to look after #1. You cannot care for anyone else if you are not physically and mentally at your best. Nursing is stressful and you are not immune from the stresses of the ward because you are a student. You may also be balancing a part time job with your studies to make ends meet. Make sure you are aware of your own mental health and you make time do to things for yourself.  Whether your idea of relaxing is running, soaking in a bath, meditation or kickboxing, just make sure you have something that allows you to escape and unwind.

Grab every opportunity that comes your way because you will be guaranteed to learn something. Don’t despair at being sent away on placement, it might be the only time in your career you find yourself working out the logistics of getting a patient back home to an island that has a runway only functional at low tide! And use the support system you have in your cohort. You will be from so many different walks of life, of different ages, with different experiences but you are all starting on the same step and you will all be going through the same highs and lows!

“I’m not telling you it’s going to be easy, I’m telling you it’s going to be worth it!”

Rachel Leighton
Third year Student Nurse, University of Stirling

The Florence Nightingale Foundation Students Day: proud to be called a nurse

Photo of Students attending Florence Nightingale Foundation Students Day 2015

Students attending Florence Nightingale Foundation Students Day 2015

I was very proud to recently being given the opportunity to represent the University of Stirling at The Florence Nightingale Foundation Students Day, which was held in London at St Thomas’s Hospital on 6th May 2015.

Different universities throughout the UK were given the opportunity to nominate nursing and midwifery students to this annual event, which is held to commemorate the life and work of Florence Nightingale. There were approximately 80 students who were invited and we all gathered in the Governor’s Hall within St Thomas’s Hospital.

There we met with the founders of The Florence Nightingale Foundation and leading healthcare professionals where we were asked to submit questions to the panel.   We all gathered in small groups and were given different topics to consider.  Some of the questions we raised were:

  • Should skills be required be standardised through all universities and trusts?
  • Do we give enough consideration to mental health in adult environments?
  • Should students have more involvement in research?
  • Leadership, is it just for management?

being just a few asked. The panel answered all the questions with enthusiasm, wisdom and experience valuing all questions asked.

Photo of Florence Nightingale

Florence Nightingale

Throughout the question and answer session we were all encouraged and supported to raise additional questions, which was a part that ended up getting very lively and gathering great enthusiasm, with great feedback received from the panel members.  The panel ensured that all questions were answered, also giving us great advice for future placements and careers, as well as advice on difficult situations like escalating concerns and getting the right support and opportunities out of our placements.

The response from the panel left us all feeling very inspired as well as feeling very proud to become nurses and midwives of the future.  A final note given was for us to believe in ourselves, it is always better to aim high, it is never too early to make a difference and to believe in ourselves. The panel members and founders of the Foundation made us all feel very welcome and ensured that we all felt relaxed, included and our opinions to be important.

Following on from the panel discussion we had the opportunity to watch a film about the life and legacy of Florence Nightingale before visiting the Chapel in St Thomas’s Hospital.  After that we went on a tour of the Florence Nightingale Museum where we learnt more about the foundation of her nursing school and how it all began.  This gave us all a good insight into Florence Nightingale’s background and the incredible research and work she achieved and the many lives she saved, as well as the impact and influence that her work still has on nursing practice today.

At the end of the day we all attended the 50th commemoration service at Westminster Abbey, with an attendance of over 2,000 people.  We had the opportunity to look around the Abbey before the service began as well as being given the opportunity to visit the Florence Nightingale Chapel.  Westminster Abbey was a truly magnificent building and was breathtaking to see.

The Florence Nightingale commemorative service began with a choir and the atmosphere was amazing which continued with a procession being led by a Florence Nightingale scholar carrying the lamp, which was lit and escorted by student nurses and midwifes.  Upon their arrival before the altar, the lamp was then passed between Florence Nightingale scholars, which is a tradition that represents the passing on of knowledge.  This service was a memorable end to a truly inspiring day.

Throughout the day I had the opportunity to meet with students studying adult nursing, mental health nursing and midwifery making many new friends along the way and learning about different students’ experiences, advice and goals.

I truly found the day to be very inspiring, educational and thought provoking.  Certainly a day I will never forget and I would certainly recommend other students, if given the opportunity in the future, to attend as it is certainly an experience that will leave you feeling extremely proud to be called a nurse.

Julie Furzer, 2nd year mental health nursing student

#HelloMyNameIs Krissy and I’m a student nurse

Photo of Krissy Scott

Krissy Scott

#HelloMyNameIs Krissy Scott and I am a 3rd year mental health nursing student, here at Stirling University.  As final year students, we were recently invited to write an article for this blog. Due to time commitments, I found myself skipping over the email. As the old saying goes, so much to do, so little time. However, within hours I found myself re-reading the email and replying to the school. There was one topic which I felt especially passionate about, and that I would not mind sparing a couple of hours for: communication in healthcare.

As we all know, excellent communication by healthcare staff is fundamental to effective, patient-centred care. We also know that the importance of good communication in healthcare is comprehensively documented upon, at a local, national and policy level. However, as healthcare staff, do we always communicate effectively with the patients that we care for? For example, do we always introduce ourselves? Kate Granger would suggest not.

Picture of Hello My Name Is logoYou may have heard of Kate. Kate is a 33 year old geriatrician from Yorkshire, who in 2011 was diagnosed with incurable cancer. It was only on becoming a patient did Kate realise, that some of the most basic, but important aspects of healthcare – such as communication and compassion – were being routinely forgotten by healthcare staff. With this in mind, Kate embarked upon a social media campaign; to remind staff about the importance of going ‘back to basics’. Kate’s media campaign is called ‘Hello. My name is’ and here is a five minute YouTube clip about it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHu6nKsgCbY&feature=player_embedded.

I wanted to share Kate’s story, not just as part of Kate’s legacy, but also to remind those of us who work clinically, of our individual capacity to make a significant difference in the lives of our patients. It really can be as simple as introducing ourselves well. As Brian the porter in the clip demonstrates, it is not our staffing grade that patients will necessarily remember, it is the level of communication, courtesy and compassion that we displayed.

On a small but personal level, I can identify with Kate’s simple desire to have healthcare staff communicate effectively. A number of years ago, I was aghast when a clinician, whom I had only just met, failed to introduce himself before delivering the news that a family member ‘clearly had autism’. The doctor then swiftly left the room. I never did find out his name but I have never forgotten how he made me feel that day.

Perhaps this is one of the reasons that Kate’s campaign has had such a profound impact upon me, and why I am almost evangelical about it. I believe it serves as a timely reminder to us all, that as healthcare professionals, we are in a privileged position with regards to our patients, and that one way or another; we will impact upon them. We should be mindful therefore to only make our impact a positive one.

Kate’s campaign has empowered me to be a more effective communicator in practice. In my last placement, I took the opportunity to share Kate’s story in a staff education session. Afterwards, a Clinical Nurse Manager who was present volunteered to inform Forth Valley’s operational division of Kate’s campaign. I have since learned that Forth Valley run a similar campaign called ‘First Impressions’.

Perhaps there is a way that you can help Kate to further her crucial ‘back to basics’ campaign?

Krissy Scott, 4 March 2015