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Mother, daughter, sister, wife… mental health nurse? Student Leanne blogs in the Nursing Times

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Student Nurse Leanne Patrick

“As a mental health professional, how do you deal with a struggling family member? Mental health student nurse Leanne describes her experience.

 

“Today, the Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH) launched the Going To Be campaign that raises awareness about the number of children affected by mental health problems and how lack of support impacts their goals, dreams and ambitions for the future. ”

For the full post, published 11 May 2017 please visit Leanne’s Nursing Times blog online.

15 May 2017

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Male Nurses Today – why men should choose a career in Nursing

Today is International Nurses’ Day and this year we are marking it with this film.

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Thanks to all students involved, both on camera and behind it.

12 May 2017

Research with Impact: Investing in Tobacco, Alcohol and Substance Use Research

researchwithimpact_bannergreenThe University of Stirling Impact Research Studentships support outstanding novel research projects that can demonstrate a link to the Universities strategic priorities and be high impact. Researchers in Health Sciences were successful in gaining three of these awards in spring 2016.

Dr Crawford Moodie, Dr Niamh Fitzgerald and Dr Tessa Parkes appointed three excellent researchers to these studentships in summer 2016 and all three started their studies in October.   Our new colleagues will be contributing to the globally-recognised work of the Tobacco, Alcohol and Substance Use Research Group.

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Andriana Manta

Andriana Manta will be working on a comparative analysis between Scotland and Greece. She aims to examine various genres of representations of the ‘drug problem’, how these representations are being reflected in the governance of the ‘drug problem’, as well as to explore possible associations with concerning changes in key indicators of public health among people who inject drugs for contributing to the wider community. The study will use a “what’s the problem represented to be” (WPR) approach to follow the construction of the drug problem, involving discourse analysis and visual analysis. The studentship is funded by the University of Stirling.

Andriana has a background in mental health research, having worked for the programme Anti-Stigma at the Athens University Mental Health Research Institute, where she was involved with both qualitative and quantitative methods of research on the stigma surrounding mental health conditions. Moreover, Andriana has an educational background in drugs and alcohol studies; she has also worked variously in the field of drugs and alcohol treatment, in Scotland and Greece, having gained a good grasp of the ‘drug problem’ realities faced by both countries.

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Danielle Mitchell

Danielle Mitchell will be working in the Institute for Social Marketing on the use of innovative tobacco packaging to deter smoking. The study will use both qualitative and quantitative methods to explore beyond the recent implemented plain packaging in the UK, in order to discover innovative methods to further deter smoking both in terms of encouraging cessation and the onset of smoking in youth.

Danielle has a background in marketing with both a BA Honours Marketing degree and an MSc in International Fashion Marketing.  Having gained knowledge and experience from carrying out mixed methods research in both her undergraduate and masters dissertations, her interest for continuous research grew and the prospect of using marketing and research techniques to impact upon the behaviour of individuals in a positive manner whilst also contributing to valuable social research.

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Clare Sharp

Clare Sharp will be working in the Institute for Social Marketing on a study which aims to understand how Nalmefene, a drug treatment for alcohol dependence, has been used in the UK, and the factors which have influenced prescribing for this drug. The study will used a mixed methods approach, involving quantitative analysis of prescribing data and qualitative methods to explore perceptions around the role of Nalmefene in treating alcohol dependence, key influences on prescribing behaviour and views about how the regulations and marketing of the drug have been handled.  The studentship is part-funded by Alcohol Research UK and the University of Stirling.

Clare has a background in social research, having worked in ScotCen Social Research for a number of years. Here, she gained considerable experience as a survey researcher, having been involved in the development, management and analysis of some of Scotland’s flagship surveys including Scottish Health Survey, Scottish Social Attitudes Survey, Growing Up in Scotland and the Scottish Crime Survey. Clare has also worked on mixed methods studies involving alcohol and tobacco, including the evaluation of the Alcohol Licensing Act and the DISPLAY project to evaluate the tobacco point of sale promotions ban.

Dr Tessa Parkes, Senior Lecturer, commented “We are delighted to welcome Danielle, Clare and Andriana to our Faculty and Research Group and wish them all well as they embark on their exciting projects.”

20 October 2016

About to start your nursing degree? Check this advice from Student Nurse Kim

Nursing_123RF_31309931_lStarting as a student nurse can be pretty scary and nerve wracking but it’s full of excitement and surprises. You might even find that it is the best decision you make. After two years as a student nurse, having never looked back, here are a few things that might help you get through first year. If not the whole of first year, at least the first few weeks!!

  • Introduce yourself to as many people as you can. You might not know everyone in your class, and you might not see them every day, but your cohort are your colleagues. The friends you make here will get you through the good and bad and they can last for life.
  • Attend all classes, and attend on time! You’ll no doubt hear rumours that it’s OK not to go to all the classes but it isn’t. They are for your benefit, you’re learning and it really does help with placement and exams. Also, try turn up on time, it’s just rude if you don’t.
  • Talking of exams and essays, prepare in advance!! Don’t leave them till the last minute, take advantage of the study time, the student support and the lecturers’ knowledge. Remember to proof-read your work too, as it can make a difference in the marks. You can always get help from friends, they provide the best support (and the coffee)!
  • Take advantage of the skills groups and sessions, including the communication ones. These are where you might see equipment for the first time, experience a skill or work as a team. You will do all sorts in these groups, so make the most of them. Use the time and take advantage of the knowledge of the lecturers, doesn’t matter if you make an error here, they will show you how to correct it and learn from your mistakes. You can often get a good laugh at these sessions, trying out a leg bandage for the first time is always interesting!
  • Placement. This is 50% of the course. The best advice here, make the most of it. Ask millions of questions, get hands on experience, research what you do, speak to other students, share your experience (without breaching confidentiality of course!) and enjoy it. You’re only in placement for a few weeks at a time so do what you can. You will be surprised how much you will learn in a short space of time. And remember to always act professionally, both in and out of placement.
  • Everyone gets a Personal Tutor; they are there for you for the three years you are in university. So why not get to know them. You’ll see them every semester after placement anyway, but nothing is stopping you speaking to them. They are not only there for your placement sign off, but a whole host of things, could be study-related or it could be personal, you don’t have to worry alone, they will listen and give the best support available.
  • So, this is your school for three years, your home if you like, then why not get involved? There are always opportunities to be a part of what the nursing course has to offer. From helping trial new interview styles to promoting your school to others there is plenty to get involved with. Offer to attend conferences and present your work – take them – great for your CV! There is no better way to show your passion for nursing than helping others.

Well, that I think covers the most important areas to think about and consider when joining us on this amazing journey. Make the most of these three years, ask questions, get creative, be inspired and be inspiring. I hope everyone enjoys their time at University just as much as I have and I wish you all the best.

© Kimberley Blues, Student Nurse (Adult), University of Stirling
29 August 2016

Florence Nightingale Students Day 2016 – Student Nurse Robert blogs

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Florence Nightingale

I had the privilege of attending the Florence Nightingale Foundation Students day this year, which was an extremely enjoyable experience. It was a great opportunity to meet fellow passionate and enthusiastic students and to discuss some of the issues that our facing our profession currently and in the future.

The day commenced with a panel discussion with four inspirational nurse leaders within their own individual fields. There were a number of great discussions had around nurse education, leadership and research. The panel provided some interesting insight into all of these areas. I found that the members of the panel were encouraging and inspirational speakers, in particular the areas of leadership and management, encouraging all of the students to be the nurse leaders of the future.

There was some interesting discussion regarding nurse education with a particular focus on generic training of nurses and the proposed cuts to the student nurse bursary.  I feel though however that some of the comments where misunderstood by the panel in these areas. For the generic teaching aspect the questions were answered and reflected on about a generic course for all nurses however the question was framed at not reducing specialised nurse courses but including more content from all fields within each student’s specialised field of nursing.

In regards to the bursary I feel that the panel where generally supportive however when I asked about the concerns I had for the students nurses of the future wellbeing, particularly in relation to workload, that this question was not addressed. I feel that this was an opportunity for an organisation as respected as the Florence Nightingale Foundation to take a stand with Student Nurses and help stop a series of cuts that will have a serious effect on future nurse numbers and the wellbeing of student nurses.  The panel where very knowledgeable and extremely encouraging however and reignited my passion after a long three years of training.

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Student Nurse Robert Murray

The only addition that could have been made was more input from the devolved nations on the panel. Each member was based within England and I think a broader discussion with all parts of the health services in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Island being represented within the panel could have given more in depth discussion around national issues.

The next part of the day included a tour of the older part of Guy’s Hospital and Florence Nightingale Museum. It was fascinating to see and hear the changes in nurse education, practice and hear stories of nursing from the Second World War within the hospital. The museum itself was fascinating to me as I did not know a lot about Florence Nightingale and I discovered why she is such an inspiration to many nurses around the world. I particularly enjoyed seeing her famous lamp which was not how I expected it to look and to see her stuffed owl that she had as a pet during her time nursing in the Crimean War.

The final organised activity was a commemoration service for Florence Nightingale at Westminster Abbey. It was a beautiful service in the most beautiful of settings and the sound of the choir singing was utterly memorising. At the service we had the chance to meet various influential people within nursing, be that NHS, government or unions. One of the most interesting parts was watching Jeremy Hunt leave the service quickly and I am sure that many of the Student Nurses would have loved to have had a conversation with him!

One of the best experiences of the whole day was having the chance to meet such fantastic student nurses from all over the UK. It was great to see such enthusiasm, commitment and passion from the future of the nursing profession.

During my time training to be a Mental Health Nurse, I have taken every opportunity given to me and I have tried my best through many roles to make the experience of Student Nurses within my University a pleasurable and empowering one. Admittedly as I approach the end of my studies my passion has waned slightly, probably due to tiredness and the continual work of a nursing student.

The chance to meet similar minded students who were continually striving for the best results for their patients, colleagues and fellow students filled me with inspiration again and has helped me build networks that hopefully in future can help improve the services we deliver throughout the UK.

Robert Murray, Student Nurse, University of Stirling
16 May 2016